05/31
Tajika Haruo Ironworks – Hand Forged Scissors and Shears from Japan

Artist Studios: Creative Spaces

Now that I have a little family of my own, I value even more so the passing of traditions from one generation to the next. My son Isaac is only a little over a year old but I hope he will enjoy making things with his hands like his mama.

On this note, I want to share with you a beautiful example of traditions taught and passed down to the next generation. The Tajika family has been producing handcrafted scissors and shears in Japan for over four generations. Each piece is hand forged and sharpened using traditional methods.

We are quite proud to be able to offer a collection of scissors and shears by Tajika Haruo Ironworks at Ashes & Milk.

Tajika Haruo Ironworks 2 Tajika Haruo Ironworks   Hand Forged Scissors and Shears from Japan
Above right sits Haruo the 3rd working back to back with his son Daisuke, who is the 4th generation to carry on the legacy of Tajika Haruo Ironworks.

Tajika Haruo Ironworks 5 Tajika Haruo Ironworks   Hand Forged Scissors and Shears from Japan
Each piece is made by hand through a very time consuming process. Above a metal blade is tempered by heat and shaped with a hammer.

Tajika Haruo Ironworks 3 Tajika Haruo Ironworks   Hand Forged Scissors and Shears from Japan
The wooden handle of this hammer is gorgeously worn to fit the hand of the artist.

Tajika Haruo Ironworks 1.5 Tajika Haruo Ironworks   Hand Forged Scissors and Shears from Japan
Sparks fly as Daisuke Tajika sharpens a scissor blade.

Tajika Haruo Ironworks 4 Tajika Haruo Ironworks   Hand Forged Scissors and Shears from Japan
Haruo meticulously inspects each pair of shears.

{ You can order your very own pair of Japanese scissors through Ashes & Milk. }

2 responses
12/17/11
10:30 am
Sondra wrote:

Totally amazing, thank you for sharing this wonderful work. I love the shapes.

01/11/12
3:05 pm
Jessica Rached wrote:

Hi Nikko,

This blog post was what made me contact you the first time. I get my glass from a small family run operation in Japan and these gorgeous images made me think of them. I also use a similar type of metal shear (not these, of course) to cut and shape my glass work. So, all in all, it felt very good to read this.

Jess

Leave a Comment